April 11, 2016
Reproductions of Kano Sanraku and Sansetsu's 22 paintings for the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin Temple were donated to Tenkyuin Temple
The Plum Room, where the donated reproduction of Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees is on display
The Plum Room, where the donated reproduction of Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees is on display
Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple
Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple
On April 11, 2016, as part of Stage 9 of the Tsuzuri Project, we produced high-resolution facsimiles of the 22 sliding door paintings located in the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin Temple. These facsimiles were donated to Tenkyuin Temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple in Kyoto.

Over a five-year period beginning in 2012, the Tsuzuri Project was involved in the reproduction of kinpeki-ga (landscape paintings made with gold-foil-pressed paper) in the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin. The facsimile project came to a conclusion with the reproduction of a total of 56 paintings on sliding doors that decorate the Morning Glory Room, the Tiger Room, and the Plum Room of the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin. These included Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees, a work originally created by the artists Kano Sanraku and Sansetsu and donated as the final contribution of this project. Following the donation of the facsimiles, the original cultural assets were entrusted to the Kyoto National Museum for safekeeping in a controlled environment.

Tenkyuin is normally closed to the public, but it is scheduled to open on special occasions in spring and autumn when the facsimiles are displayed in place of the original artworks.
March 18, 2016
Reproductions of Tosa Mitsuyoshi's "Scenes from The Tale of Genji" were donated to Byodoin Temple
Scenes from The Tale of Genji installed at the Byodoin Museum Hoshokan
Scenes from The Tale of Genji installed at the Byodoin Museum Hoshokan
Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Byodoin Temple, a World Heritage Site
Byodoin Temple, a World Heritage Site
As part of Stage 9 of the Tsuzuri Project, Scenes from The Tale of Genji were reproduced and the facsimiles were donated to Byodoin Temple in Kyoto on March 18, 2016.

The Tale of Genji comprises 54 chapters; these screens depict scenes from the chapters titled Sekiya, Miyuki and Ukifune. It is believed that these screens were part of the original sliding doors that enclosed the room. The original art is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the U.S.A. In cooperation with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Tsuzuri Project produced high-resolution facsimiles of Scenes from The Tale of Genji. These reproductions were donated to Byodoin Temple, Uji, Kyoto as a symbolic homecoming to the setting of The Tale of Genji.

The high-resolution facsimiles of a pair of four-fold screens depicting Scenes from The Tale of Genji were installed at Byodoin Museum Hoshokan and displayed to the public in a special exhibition open until April 24.
April 23, 2015
Reproduction of Hasegawa Tohaku's "Dragon and Tiger" is donated to Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Press conference explaining the donation
Press conference explaining the donation
Presentation at the opening ceremony
Presentation at the opening ceremony
'Dragon and Tiger' opened to the public after the ceremony
"Dragon and Tiger" opened to the public after the ceremony
The new Oita Prefectural Art Museum
The new Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Photograph from 'The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students'
Photograph from "The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students"
As part of the "Tsuzuri Project," we created high-definition facsimiles of the masterpiece "Dragon and Tiger" in cooperation with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and donated it to the new Oita Prefectural Art Museum, which opened on April 24.

On April 23, a press conference was held before the opening of the museum, where the facsimile screens of the "Tsuzuri Project" were introduced. These screens will be exhibited in the museum as well as used in the art appreciation education event to which all 60,000 elementary school students in Oita Prefecture are invited through "The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students" project.

The epic "Dragon and Tiger," painted by Hasegawa Tohaku in his later years, is currently owned by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the United States.
March 13, 2015
Reproduction of Soga Shohaku's "Dragon and Clouds" donated to Tenryuji Temple
'Dragon and Clouds' on display in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber
"Dragon and Clouds" on display in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber
Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Large abbot's chamber beyond Sogen Pond Garden, a Japanese Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance
Large abbot's chamber beyond Sogen Pond Garden, a Japanese Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance
As part of Stage 8 of the Tsuzuri Project, high-resolution facsimiles of the "Dragon and Clouds" panels were donated to Kyoto's Tenryuji Temple on March 13, 2015.

"Dragon and Clouds," a series of panels by Soga Shohaku, a painter of the Edo period, is a work believed to have been designed for use as sliding doors. This work is now in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, U.S.A., which generously consented to the creation of high-resolution facsimiles of this work as part of Stage 8 of the Tsuzuri Project. The reproduction was donated to Tenryuji Temple, which is itself named after a dragon. The work can once again be seen in Kyoto, the birthplace of Soga Shohaku.

The high-resolution facsimiles of all eight panels of "Dragon and Clouds" will be displayed in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber facing Sogen Pond Garden, a beautiful setting designated by the Japanese Government as a Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance. This reproduction is scheduled to be displayed to the public for about 90 days every year as part of a special exhibition.
May 30, 2012
The "Cherry blossoms" and "Cranes" Folding Screens were created and donated to the Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture.
Donated 'Cherry blossoms' folding screen
Donated "Cherry blossoms" folding screen
Donated 'Cranes' folding screen
Donated "Cranes" folding screen
Shooting segmented images
Shooting segmented images
On May 30, 2012, two works for Stage 5 were produced and donated to the Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture. These are high-resolution facsimiles of "Cherry blossoms", believed to have been created by Tawaraya Sotatsu, and "Cranes" by Ogata Korin, the originals of which are in the possession of the Freer Gallery of Art. These facsimiles are expected to be used for art appreciation workshops by the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, which is managed and operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture.

The Donation Ceremony was held at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum. In addition to the exhibition of the two works, segmented images were shot with a Canon Digital SLR Camera and processed by Canon's unique image processing software; the result was printed on a large-format inkjet printer. Moreover, an authentic gold leaf craftsman gave a demonstration of the process of applying gold leaf.
December 14, 2011
20 high-resolution facsimiles of the "Sliding Panels in the Abbot's Chambers at Kenninji Temple"
(Important Cultural Property) were created and donated to Kenninji Temple
General Manager Sumiko Sawada of the Social and Cultural Program Division handing over the donation list
General Manager Sumiko Sawada of the Social and Cultural Program Division handing over the donation list
Donated facsimiles of the 'Seven Sages in a Bamboo Grove'
Donated facsimiles of the "Seven Sages in a Bamboo Grove"
20 high-resolution facsimiles of the "Sliding Panels in the Abbot's Chambers at Kenninji Temple" were created in Stage 5 of the Tsuzuri Project and donated to Kenninji Temple in Kyoto on Wednesday, December 14, 2011.
The "Sliding Panels in the Abbot's Chambers at Kenninji Temple" are a collection of 50 panels (Important Cultural Property) which had been displayed in the abbot's chambers at Kenninji Temple, which is considered a headquarters for the Rinzai sect of Buddhism. The panels were painted by Kaiho Yusho who was active from the Azuchi-Momoyama period to the Edo period.A total of 20 panels were donated to Kenninji Temple this time, composed of 16 panels of the "Seven Sages in a Bamboo Grove" and 4 panels of "Landscapes".
Of all 50 panels, 4 panels were created in Stage 2 of the Tsuzuri Project and 12 panels were created in Stage 4. Now in Stage 5, 20 panels were created.The remaining 14 panels are scheduled to be created in Stage 6 between April 2012 and March 2013. The high-resolution facsimiles created in the Tsuzuri Project were donated to Kenninji Temple where the original panels had been displayed. The created panels are currently on display in their original locations after an absence of about 70 years.
In 2014, Kenninji Temple will commemorate the eight hundredth anniversary of the death of Yousai, the Zen monk who founded the temple, and commemorative activities for the anniversary have been planned. The high-resolution facsimiles of the "Sliding Panels in the Abbot's Chambers at Kenninji Temple" donated by the Tsuzuri Project are being created as part of these activities.
November 19, 2011
Family Workshop to be held at the Tokyo National Museum
Works from the Tsuzuri Project were explained and used as examples in the workshop.
Works from the Tsuzuri Project were explained and used as examples in the workshop.
Miniatures were used in demonstrations of how folding screens were arranged in various ways.
Miniatures were used in demonstrations of how folding screens were arranged in various ways.
On Saturday, November 19, Canon and the Tokyo National Museum collaborated on a family-oriented workshop titled "An Introduction to Folding Screen Art," continuing an initiative launched in May. This workshop made use of high-resolution facsimiles of artworks created through the Tsuzuri Project.
A total of five groups of 12 participants participated in the workshop, despite heavy rain on the day of the event. Participants included students from the upper grades of elementary school and junior high school students and their families.
The workshop began with a presentation on "Maple Viewers" and other actual folding screens in the National Treasure Gallery on the second floor of the main building. The workshop then moved to the Okyokan — a tea room constructed as a study — where curators presented details of the Tsuzuri Project and outlined the production process.
There, participants tried their hand at arranging the folding screens in various ways. For example, each family was free to lay out an actual-size folding screen using "Pine Trees," a work reproduced under the Tsuzuri Project.
The shutters of the Okyokan were then closed and the interior was illuminated only with simulated candlelight to demonstrate how the screens originally appeared when viewed inside the dark rooms of that era.
The young people who participated in the event were impressed by the workshop, saying, "It was a rare experience that I wouldn't normally have a chance to take part in," and "The lighting demonstration at the end was really interesting." Clearly, the workshop gave the participants an excellent and rare opportunity to experience the magnificence of traditional Japanese culture.
May 21, 2011
Family Workshop to be held at the Tokyo National Museum
Photography method used for the Tsuzuri Project explained.
Photography method used for the Tsuzuri Project explained.
Participants observe Waves at Matsushima up close.
Participants observe Waves at Matsushima up close.
Recreating the darkness of rooms in olden days.
Recreating the darkness of rooms in olden days.
A family-oriented workshop was held at the Tokyo National Museum on Saturday, May 21. The workshop, "Introduction to Folding Screen Art!" was co-sponsored by Canon and the Tokyo National Museum, and used high resolution facsimiles made by the Tsuzuri Project.
Six families, or a total of 14 participants from late elementary to junior high school participated in the workshop. The workshop began with an explanation by the curator using authentic folding screens, such as "The Tale of Genji". Participants were able to observe the screens after which they proceeded to the Okyokan, a tea room in the study located on the museum premises. Here, the participants listened to a presentation on the Tsuzuri Project and learned about the types of Canon cameras and lenses used in the project.
The participants then used miniature folding screens to experiment with various layouts, and then tried their own hands at dividing space in a Japanese-style home using the Pine Trees and Waves at Matsushima folding screens created by the Tsuzuri Project. To experience how people saw the folding screens when they were originally created, the participants worked with incident daylight and simulated candle light.
Children participating in the event gave us their impression: "the most memorable part was arranging the folding screens in various shapes", "it was very interesting and I got to learn a lot." Parents commented: "it was good to experience how the screens appeared to people in the old days", "being able to see the screens in natural light was great." The workshop gave the participants a firsthand experience of traditional Japanese culture.
May 25, 2011
"Folding Screens of Edo Customs" and other works from Stage 4 donated
'Viewing Cherry Blossoms at Ueno Park and Autumn at Asakusa' (Hishikawa Moronobu)
"Viewing Cherry Blossoms at Ueno Park and Autumn at Asakusa" (Hishikawa Moronobu)
A scene of the donation ceremony
A scene of the donation ceremony
From April 18 to 27, 2011, cultural artifacts created in Stage 4 of the Tsuzuri Project were donated. These high-resolution facsimiles are to be bestowed to museums and art galleries, and to Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines, where they are expected to be used for general public exhibition and for educational and other purposes.

The works completed in Stage 4 are as follows:
February 17, 2011
Ceremony marking donation of National Treasure, "The Wind and Thunder Gods"
“The Wind and Thunder Gods” (Tawaraya Sotatsu)
"The Wind and Thunder Gods" (Tawaraya Sotatsu)
A scene of the donation ceremony
A scene of the donation ceremony
A ceremony was held on February 8, 2011, to mark the donation of a facsimile of "The Wind and Thunder Gods" (a National Treasure painted by Tawaraya Sotatsu,) which was created as part of the fourth stage of the Tsuzuri Project.
The high resolution facsimile was one of those displayed in the Japanese pavilion at the Shanghai Expo last year, where it was highly acclaimed. It was donated to Kyoto’s Kenninji Temple, where it will be put on display for the general public.
August 6, 2010
Production of 46 high resolution facsimiles of the Wall and Screen Painting of Hojo hall of Kenninji, a collection of Important Cultural Properties.
Wall and Screen Painting of Hojo hall of Kenninji (partial scrolls), Azuchi-Momoyama period, Kaiho Yusho.
Wall and Screen Painting of Hojo hall of Kenninji (partial scrolls), Azuchi-Momoyama period, Kaiho Yusho.
The Wall and Screen Painting of Hojo hall of Kenninji are a collection of 50 panels (Important Cultural Property) displayed at the original head temple of Kenninji. The panels were painted by Kaiho Yusho, an artist who lived from Azuchi-Momoyama to Edo period. This collection represents Japan's most renown ink and water paintings on fusuma, sliding doors, and consists of 16 panels of the Seven Sages in a Bamboo Grove, 10 panels of the Four Decent Hobbies, 8 panels of Dragon and Clouds, 8 panels of Landscapes, and 8 panels of Flowers and Birds. Remarkably, the sliding doors were removed by coincidence before a heavy typhoon arrived and destroyed the Hojo hall at Kenninji in 1934. As a safeguard against future natural disasters, the sliding doors were converted into scrolls and are currently stored in the Kyoto National Museum.
The Tsuzuri Project completed 4 of the 50 panels, Dragon and Clouds, during Stage 2. High resolution facsimiles of the remaining 46 panels will be produced during the 3-year period from Stage 4 (August 2010 to March 2011) to Stage 6 (April 2012 to March 2013). The Project will contribute the completed facsimiles to Kenninji, the original owner, finally arriving home after about 70 years. The panels will be displayed to the public in their original form as sliding doors in the Hojo hall.
In 2014, Kenninji will commemorate the Eight hundredth anniversary of a Zen monk, Yosai's death. The high resolution facsimiles of the Wall and Screen Painting of Hojo hall of Kenninji are to be contributed as part of this commemoration.
March 30, 2010
Stage 3, Donation Ceremony and Special Exhibition
Stage 3, Donation Ceremony and Special Exhibition
On March 26, 2010, a ceremony commemorating the donation of works completed in Stage 3 and a special exhibition was held at Kenninji Temple, the oldest Zen temple in Kyoto's Higashiyama ward. The completed high resolution facsimiles were presented to their recipients who are expected to display and make use of them on various occasions.

The works completed in Stage 3 are as follows:
Kyoto Culture Association (NPO)
Canon Inc.
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Kyoto Culture Association (NPO)
Formerly Kyoto City Seitoku Junior high school 3F
290 Hanjocho Takatsuji Street Muromachi nishi
Shimogyo ku
Kyoto City, Kyoto
Japan 600-8433